Instrumental Music PDLCs

About Instrumental Music PDLCs

Instrumental Music PDLCs are based on contemporary experimental and practical research in Music Learning Theory, audiation, and beginning instrumental instruction. Fundamental is the belief that a music instrument is an extension of the human mind and body. In other words, students will only learn to play instruments in tune, rhythmically, and with consistent tempo as well as they can sing in tune, chant, and move the body rhythmically with a consistent tempo.

Using Music Learning Theory, students simultaneously learn two instruments—the audiation instrument (the instrument in the mind) and the executive instrument (the physical instrument). Instrumental PDLCs focus on audiation development so that instrumental performance becomes an extension of the student’s audiation.

Instrumental Music PDLCs consists of two parts: the study of Music Learning Theory and the practical application of that theory. The practical application of Music Learning Theory includes the following: 1) motivating students to be successful in performing on an instrument with enjoyment and good musicianship, 2) how to teach students to perform on an instrument without the aid of notation, 3) how to teach students to read notation on an instrument with comprehension, and 4) how to provide students with the readiness to continue meaningful performance on their instrument and to become intelligent makers and consumers of music during and beyond their formal education.

Courses

Instrumental Faculty

Terry Bacon

CHURCHVILLE-CHILI NY SCHOOLS

Dr. Richard Grunow

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Dr. Kathy Liperote

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Dr. Herbert Marshall

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY


Michael E. Martin

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Dr. Jennifer S. McDonel

RADFORD UNIVERSITY

Dr. Alden Snell

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Dr. David Stringham

JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

Instrumental, Level 1

Course Description

Based on an extensive body of research and practical field-testing, this course offers a sequential approach to beginning instrumental music instruction that progresses from listening, singing, moving, and improvising to reading, writing, composing, and arranging music with comprehension. With an emphasis on “how children learn music,” participants develop musicianship and teaching skills appropriate for all levels of instrumental music instruction. 

Course Outcomes

Participants will:

  • improve their understanding of how children learn music.
  • establish appropriate "methods" (what, when, and why) for teaching instrumental music.
  • develop teaching "techniques" (how) necessary to implement those methods.
  • improve their musicianship skills for teaching.
  • develop procedures for assessing students’ music aptitude and music achievement. 
  • develop procedures for recruiting beginning instrumental students.
  • understand the role of instrumental music within a comprehensive music curriculum. 

Course Content

  • Theory and Practical Application
  • Types and Levels of Music Learning Theory
  • Skill Learning Sequence, and Tonal and Rhythm Content Learning Sequence
  • Topics include (a) song instruction, (b) tonal pattern and rhythm pattern instruction, (c) tonal syllables and rhythm syllables, (d) improvisation, (e) composition, (f) assessment, and (g) instrumental performance. 

Required Materials

  • Gordon, E. E. (2012). Learning sequences in music: A contemporary music learning theory. Chicago: GIA.
  • Grunow, R. F., Azzara, C. D., & Gordon, E. E. (2021). Jump right in:  The instrumental series – Teacher's guide for recorder (3rd ed.). Chicago: GIA.

OR

  • Grunow, R. F., Gordon, E. E., & Azzara, C. D. (2001). Jump right in:  The instrumental series – Teacher's guide for winds and percussion (2nd ed.). Chicago: GIA.

OR

  • Grunow, R. F., Gordon, E. E., Azzara, C. D., & Martin, M. E. (2002). Jump right in:  The instrumental series – Teacher's guide for strings (2nd ed.). Chicago: GIA.

AND

  • Grunow, R. F., Azzara, C. D., & Gordon, E. E. (2021). Jump right in:  The instrumental seriesSoprano Recorder Book (J380 Audio Files Online) (3rd ed.). Chicago: GIA.
  • Soprano Recorder
  • Wind, Brass, Percussion (Mallet), or String Instrument
  • Internet Access

Pre-Requisites

Participants should be familiar with the songs, tonal patterns (neutral syllable and solfege), and rhythm patterns (neutral syllable and rhythm syllables) available on the Tonal and Rhythm Skills Development CD, (Grunow, R. F., Gordon, E. E., & Azzara, C. D., (2010) Chicago: GIA.)

Instrumental, Level 2

COMING SOON!

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