GIML Faculty

Professional Development Learning Course (PDLC) Faculty

Click on each faculty member for more information.

•Eastman School of Music

Terry Bacon, M.M.
• Churchville-Chili (NY) Central School District
Jennifer Bailey, M.M.
• Farmington (MI) Public Schools
Beth Bolton, Ph.D.
• Temple University
Suzanne Burton, Ph.D.
• University of Delaware
Martin Edery
• Estudio de Música de Angels Casas, Barcelona, Spain
Jennifer Fisher, M.A.
• Eastern Michigan University
Richard Grunow, Ph.D.
• Eastman School of Music
Holley Haynes, M.M.
• Hilton (NY) Central School District
Christina Hornbach, Ph.D.
• Hope College
Krista Jadro, M.M.
• Brookline (MA) Music School
Heather Kirby, M.M.
• Dedham (MA) Public Schools
Diane Lange, Ph.D.
• University of Texas, Arlington
Kathy Liperote, Ph.D.
• Eastman School of Music
Marilyn Lowe, M.M.
• Springfield, Missouri
Herbert Marshall, Ph.D.
• Baldwin Wallace Conservatory
Michael E. Martin, M.M.
• University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Jennifer S. McDonel, Ph.D.
• Radford University
Carin McEvoy, M.M.
• Michigan State University Community Music School
Janna Olson, M.M.
• Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)
Anna Preston, M.M.
• Haddonfield (NJ) Friends School
Alba Pujol Camins, M.M.
• Barcelona, Spain
Jill Reese, Ph.D.
• State University of New York at Fredonia
Alison Reynolds, Ph.D.
• Temple University
Heather Nelson Shouldice, Ph.D.
• Eastern Michigan University
Natasha Sigmund, M.M.
• Cinnaminson Township (NJ) Public Schools
Alden Snell, Ph.D.
• Eastman School of Music
David Stringham, Ph.D.
• James Madison University
Cynthia Crump Taggart, Ph.D.
• Michigan State University
Wendy Valerio, Ph.D.
• University of South Carolina

Our faculty are available to present at wide variety of conferences and workshops. Please download our Faculty Workshop Sessions (2020) list to learn more.

Faculty Biographies

Christopher Azzara, Ph.D.

eastman school of music

Pianist, arranger, author, and educator, Christopher Azzara has made important contributions to advancing the understanding of creativity and improvisation in the music learning process. An innovator in music teaching and learning, Dr. Azzara is Professor of MusicTeaching & Learning and Affiliate Faculty of Jazz Studies & Contemporary Media at the Eastman School of Music. Teaching and performing internationally, he is the author of numerous articles, arrangements, and books, including Developing Musicianship Through Improvisation and Jump Right In: The Instrumental Series (GIA). His arrangements for instrumental and vocal ensembles include A la nanita nana for choir and chamber orchestra or piano (Oxford), and Concert Selections for Winds and Percussion (GIA).

His research and publications are concerned with meaningful relationships among listening, creating, improvising, reading, composing, and analyzing music in vocal and instrumental settings. Dr. Azzara's work appears in journals such as the Journal of Research in Music Education, the Bulletin of the Council for Research in MusicEducation, the Music Educators Journal, Early Childhood Connections, and in The New Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning (MENC/Oxford), and Oxford Handbooks Online.

He performs as a soloist and in various ensembles, including the Chris Azzara Trio, and has played on and produced many studio and educational recordings. In Rochester, he performs with freelance musicians, members of the Eastman School of Music Faculty, and members of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. An active teacher and clinician, he has presented and performed extensively throughout the United States, and in Canada, the Caribbean, France, Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, China, Japan, and Australia. He has presented clinics and workshops in a variety of settings, including TEDxRochester, thePittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Carnegie Hall, and leading music schools in this country and abroad.

Christopher Azzara is a native of Virginia and attended public schools in Fairfax County.After receiving the Bachelor of Music degree from George Mason University, he taught instrumental music in the Fairfax County Public Schools and performed as a pianist in the Washington D.C. area. He later received a Master of Music and a Ph.D. in Music Education from the Eastman School of Music. Prior to joining the Eastman faculty, Dr. Azzara was a professor at The Hartt School of Music, Dance, and Theatre of the University of Hartford, CT.

Terry Bacon, M.M.

Churchville-Chili (NY) Central School District

Terrence E. Bacon is an instrumental and general music teacher in the Churchville-Chili Central School District. He holds a Master of Music Education from Michigan State University and a Bachelor of Music in Instrumental Music Education and Saxophone Performance from the Eastman School of Music. Additionally, he is both adjunct faculty and a doctoral student in the Graduate School of Education at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York.

Terry is active in the field of music education and was the founding president of the New York State Chapter of the Gordon Institute for Music Learning (NY-GIML) and continues to serve the organization as Chapter Advisor. He is Education Faculty for GIML national in the areas of Music Learning Theory and for Instrumental applications. He has been a workshop and professional development presenter in the areas of early childhood music education, Music Learning Theory, instrumental music, and the use of technology in music education. 

Mr. Bacon is a frequent conductor of school and community pit orchestras and has conducted more than 35 productions. Terry joined the staff of the Chautauqua Music Camps in 2000 and has served as the band camp director and conductor since 2005. He has been honored to conduct numerous elementary and junior high honor bands around Western New York.

As a member of the Tower Saxophone Quartet, Terry performed four times at the White House, was profiled on NPR's Morning Edition, participated in the National Endowment for the Arts Rural Residency Program, and recorded a CD of music for saxophone quartet. Mr. Bacon continues to be active as a saxophonist, having performed with the Chautauqua Symphony, the Battle Creek, MI Symphony, and the Albany, GA Symphony, as well as in recitals, pit orchestras, and community ensembles. He is married to professional clarinetist, Dr. Marcy Bacon and together they have a son, Eirnin.

Terry may be reached at baconterr@mac.com.

Jennifer Bailey, M.M.

Farmington (MI) Public Schools

Jennifer is an elementary music specialist for Farmington Public Schools  with twenty-five years of experience teaching.   Jennifer holds a B.M. in flute performance from Michigan State University, teacher certification from the University of Houston, and a M.M. Ed. from Temple University.  She was named Music Educator of the Year by the Michigan Music Education Association  and Arts Educator of the Year by Michigan Youth Arts in 2018.

Jennifer is a GIML professional development faculty member in the areas of Early Childhood and Elementary General Music.  She also served as president for the Mid-Atlantic and Michigan chapters as well as GIML past-present.   Jennifer’s website, singtokids.com, hosts her blog, where she discusses a variety of music education topics.  She is the author of Sing To Kids Songbooks and a co-author of the Jump Right In Elementary Music Series.  Jennifer is a frequent presenter at clinics for state and regional music education conferences.

Beth Bolton, Ph.D.

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

Beth is a composer, having written more than 600 original songs for teachers, children and parents. The songs are compiled in several books: Musicianship, Katangaroo, Crazy Eights (Beth Bolton Music), L’albero delle canzoni (Orff Schulwerk Italiano), Gnu Katangaroo (forthcoming 2021)  and Audiation Musicianship (forthcoming 2021).   Recordings of Dr. Bolton’s original songs may be found in the CD recordings for Jump Right In: The Music Curriculum (GIA) and Music Play (GIA), and on Pickles and Pie (Bestbael Music), Rock-A-Bye Blues (Julie Wylie Music, NZ), L’albero delle canzoni (Orff Schulwerk Italiano) and Beautiful Day by Kira Rappaport (www.MusicWithKira.com). 

Beth is a member of the faculty of the Gordon Institute for Music Learning in the United States. She has served as a featured presenter at universities, conservatories, workshops, and conferences throughout the United States, and in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, China, Cyprus, the Dominican Republic, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, Korea, New Zealand, Portugal, Singapore, and Spain.  She teaches annually in Spain and Italy in early childhood music Level 1 and 2 courses offered by Musica in Culla.  Dr. Bolton is the honorary president of Musica in Culla (Music in the Crib), an international organization of early childhood music associations in Italy and Spain. 

Prior to doctoral studies at Temple University with Edwin Gordon, Beth was an elementary general music teacher for 15 years.  Upon serving as videographer for Wendy Hicks Valerio’s landmark dissertation study with infants and toddlers, “An Investigation of the Initial Stages of Preparatory Audiation” (1992), Beth became deeply interested in early childhood music.   She taught early childhood music classes with Edwin Gordon during his last few years at Temple University, and for many years she continued teaching very young children at Temple Music Prep and Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, near Philadelphia.  Currently, she focuses on observing children’s music responses as she sings, moves, and plays with her 8 grandchildren (ages 10 months to 20 years) in “The Grandma Lab.”   Most recently she has begun a systematic observation of music learning theory based early childhood music classes in several locations in Europe.  

Beth is deeply interested in the work of Lev Vygotsky, Daniel Stern, Maria Montessori, and Edwin Gordon, and in using ideas prominent in each of their practices to observe and interact musically with very young children. 

Dr. Bolton is a co-author of Jump Right In: The Music Curriculum (GIA), a music series for elementary general music teachers and Music Play (GIA), a teacher guidebook for early childhood music which has been translated and published in Lithuania, Korea, and China.

Beth currently serves as Vice Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs in the Center for Performing and Cinematic Arts at Temple University.  She serves faculty and students in music, dance, theater, film, and media arts.  She is responsible for developing international partnerships for the Center to promote faculty and student exchange and provide opportunities for collaboration and research.  

Suzanne Burton, Ph.D.

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

Dr. Suzanne L. Burton is Professor of Music at the University of Delaware where she is Associate Dean for the Arts in the College of Arts and Sciences. Her scholarly interests include music teacher preparation and professional learning, music acquisition, music literacy, and technology in early childhood music. 

Dr. Burton’s research may be found in scholarly journals and book chapters published by Ashgate, GIA, Oxford University Press, and Rowman & Littlefield Education. Noted for her editorial work, she is co-editor of and contributor to Creative Music Making at your Fingertips: A Mobile Technology Guide for Music Educators; Learning from Young Children: Research in Early Childhood Music; Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Instrumental Music; and Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Elementary General Music. She is sole editor of and contributor to Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music and co-author of Ready, Set, Improvise!: The Nuts and Bolts Approach to Music Improvisation. 

Dr. Burton serves on the International Journal of Music in Early Childhood editorial board and is chair of the International Society for Music Education Early Childhood Music Education Commission. She holds the A.A. (piano pedagogy) and B.M. (music education) from Spring Arbor University, and the M.M. and Ph.D. (music education) from Michigan State University.

Jennifer Fisher, M.A.

Eastern Michigan University

Jennifer Fisher earned a Bachelor of Arts in Music Therapy from Western Illinois University & a Master of Arts in Piano Pedagogy from Eastern Michigan University.  She went on to earn level 1 certifications from the Gordon Institute of Music Learning (GIML) in piano & elementary general music as well as level 1 & 2 certifications in early childhood music.  She currently teaches functional piano classes for music majors/minors & group piano pedagogy at Eastern Michigan University & serves on the faculty of EMU’s Community Music Academy.  At Concordia University-Ann Arbor her assignments are applied lessons, beginning piano & keyboard skills classes.  Summers often find her serving as a GIML faculty member.  Finally, Jennifer also has a modest personal studio with students aged 4-74!

Richard Grunow, Ph.D.

Eastman School of Music

Richard F. Grunow is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Music Teaching and Learning at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. A leading innovator in beginning instrumental music instruction, Dr. Grunow is an active lecturer and clinician, having presented in forty-two of the United States, and in Canada, Austria, Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Japan, and the French West Indies. His research and teaching focus on applications of Music Learning Theory to instrumental music instruction, instrumental and choral score reading, measurement and evaluation, and music literacy.

Professor Grunow is author of numerous articles and co-author of the MLR Instrumental Score Reading Program, MLR Instrumental Score Reading Test, Choral Score Reading Program, Creativity in Improvisation, and Developing Musicianship through Improvisation. He is principal author of Jump Right In: The Instrumental Series, a comprehensive beginning instrumental curriculum for recorder, woodwinds, brass, strings, and percussion. The Third Edition of Jump Right In: The Instrumental Series for Recorder was released in Fall 2020. The series features over 350 recordings of folk songs and classical melodies comprising a variety of tonalities and meters from a broad range of cultures. Performances are by artist faculty and students at the Eastman School of Music and members of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and Rhythm & Brass. 

A Wisconsin native, Dr. Grunow received a Bachelor of Science in Music Education from the University of Wisconsin - Platteville where he is a Distinguished Alumnus and recipient of the Arts and Letters Hall of Fame Award. From 1967-74, he taught instrumental music in Beloit, Wisconsin Public Schools. He received a Master of Music and a PhD in Music Education from The University of Michigan, served as Director of the Instrumental Laboratory School, and was on the faculty in the Music Education Department prior to his appointment at Eastman in 1979. 

Contact:

rfgrunow@gmail.com

(585) 261-4852

Holley Haynes, M.M.

Hilton (NY) Central School District

Holley Haynes has been devoted to teaching music to children for 17 years. Holley resides in the Rochester, NY area and currently teaches general music at Village Elementary School in Hilton, NY. Prior to joining the music team at Hilton, Holley taught preschool at the Mendon Community Nursery School (MCNS) in Mendon, NY. At MCNS she was the lead teacher for their 3 year-olds class and their Music and Literature classes. Prior to moving to the Rochester area in 2009, she taught at Temple University’s early childhood music program and in the public schools in New Jersey. Recently, several of Holley's songs and lesson plans have been published in Music Play 2: An Early Childhood Music Curriculum.  

Holley Haynes has a Bachelor of Music Education from Rutgers University and a Master of Music Education from Temple University. She is a faculty member for the Gordon Institute for Music Learning in early childhood music. She also supervises and mentors music education student teachers in the Rochester area for SUNY Fredonia. Holley has shared her expertise with parents, undergraduate students, teachers, and music educators in the United States and China through presentations and workshops.

Christina Hornbach, Ph.D.

HOPE COLLEGE

Christina Hornbach is professor of music and director of music education at Hope College, Holland, Michigan. Hornbach received a Bachelor of Music and a Master of Music from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) and a Doctor of Philosophy from Michigan State University (East Lansing). She has presented workshops at the state, regional, and national MENC/NAfME In-Service Conferences, as well as local and international venues. She has published her work in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Listen to Their Voices: Research and Practice in Early Childhood Music, Learning from Young Children: Research in Early Childhood Music, and the Michigan Music Educator. She has served as President of the Michigan Music Education Association. Hornbach specializes in early childhood and elementary general music methods and materials. She has taught general music in the public schools in Michigan and Minnesota as well as early childhood music at Michigan State University's Community Music School and Eastern Michigan University’s Community Music Academy. Hornbach also founded an early childhood music program, Early Bird Music, in west Michigan. She was first introduced to Music Learning Theory when she began her doctoral work with Dr. Cindy Taggart. She is currently serving on the board (Publication Commission) and faculty of the Gordon Institute for Music Learning (Elementary General).

Krista Jadro, M.M. 

BROOKLINE (MA) MUSIC SCHOOL

Krista Jadro is the owner of Music Learning Academy, an online resource center dedicated to supporting teachers using the principles set forth in Music Learning Theory and the Music Moves for Piano method for audiation-based piano instruction. Through the Music Learning Academy, Krista conducts online courses and presents and hosts webinars and workshops. She also provides free resources through her Music Learning Academy Presents podcast, videos on her YouTube channel, and articles on her website (musiclearningacademy.com). Krista has a thriving piano studio with and is a consultant for Brookline Music School’s early childhood and group piano programs. She is also a consultant to the Arts Education and Special Needs Music Classes for Young Children programs at the Berklee Institute in Boston.  Prior to these positions, she redesigned  and directed Brookline Music School’s early childhood and group piano program, taught early childhood music classes, and taught general music to students with autism. Krista has completed professional development levels in Music Learning Theory (Level I Early Childhood, Level I Elementary General, and Level I Piano) and is on the piano faculty with the Gordon Institute for Music Learning. She earned degrees in Music Education from University of Delaware (M.M, B.M.).

Heather Kirby, M.M.

Dedham (MA) Public Schools

Heather Kirby teaches PreK-5 music in the Dedham Public Schools. In addition to teaching children, she mentors new teachers and pre-teachers through providing observation opportunities and acting as a cooperating teacher. A graduate of the University of Massachusetts-Lowell (1992, BM, cum laude) and Temple University (2005, MM, Phi Kappa Lambda), she is a faculty member of the Gordon Institute for Music Learning and holds Level 2 Certification with the Kodály Music Institute at New England Conservatory. 

Mrs. Kirby is co-developer of the nationally accredited early childhood education provider Primrose Schools’ Harmony & Heart music program. She has written many songs and chants which have been published in the US and abroad, and her collection Modal Tunes for Movement is used in music programs across the country. 

In addition to music teaching, Heather maintains an active performing life as cantor for Holy Family Parish, Rockland; cellist for the Parkway Concert Orchestra; and keyboard/percussionist/vocalist for The Dred Sox Band.

Diane Lange, Ph.D.

University of Texas, Arlington

Diane Lange is Professor and Music Program Director of Field Experience at the University of Texas at Arlington where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Early Childhood and Elementary Music Education. 

Dr. Lange has taught elementary music for ten years in both Michigan and Nevada. She received her Orff Levels and Master Class at Memphis State University and GIML Level I and II at Michigan State University. She also received the Outstanding Educator Award from the Crawford AuSable School District in 1994 and the Hilda Humphrey Service Award in 1992 from the Michigan Music Educators Association.  In 2019 she was awarded and is now a member of The Academy of Distinguished Teachers at the University of Texas at Arlington.  The award recognizes tenured faculty for a sustained record of outstanding teaching, personal commitment to students and the learning process, and the ability to motivate and inspire students.  

Dr. Lange received her Bachelor of Music in Education and Master of Music from Central Michigan University and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. She has presented several pedagogical workshops and consultations in many states and in Greece and New Zealand.  She has published Recycle your Literature:  Combining Orff Schulwerk and Music Learning Theory, Together in Harmony:  Combining Orff Schulwerk and Music Learning Theory, Together Again in Harmony:  Combing Orff Schulwerk and Music Learning Theory, a chapter on combining Music Learning Theory and Orff Schulwerk that appeared in Music Learning Theory: Theory in Practice and several articles in General Music Today. Also, she is a co-author for Jump Right In:  The Elementary Music Curriculum, Grades Kindergarten and 5.  Dr. Lange was president for the National Gordon Institute for Music Learning, and North Texas chapter of AOSA and was regional representative for Early Childhood Music and Movement Association where she hosted an Early Childhood Conference.  Currently Dr. Lange is a certified faculty member where she teaches GIML Level I around the country.

Kathy Liperote, Ph.D.

 Eastman School of Music

Kathy Liperote is Assistant Professor of Music Education (pt) in the Department of Music Teaching and Learning at the Eastman School of Music, where she teaches methods classes, observes student teachers, and supervises graduate teaching assistants. Her teaching and research focus on the music learning process, connecting aural skills to instrumental performance, and developing musicianship skills for elementary and secondary level teaching. Her work is published in the Music Educators Journal, The Routledge Companion to Interdisciplinary Studies in Singing, and Audiation: La Rivista. Dr. Liperote has presented at state and regional NAfME conferences in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. She has conducted professional development workshops most recently at Temple University, Baldwin Wallace University, and the Fort Worth Independent School District. Dr. Liperote has served on the Instrumental Certification Faculty for the Gordon Institute for Music Learning since 2005.

Prior to receiving her PhD in Music Education from the Eastman School, Dr. Liperote taught instrumental music for 15 years in the Baldwinsville and West Genesee School Districts in Central New York State. She is a graduate of the Crane School of Music (Bachelor of Music) and Syracuse University (Master of Science in Music Education).

Marilyn Lowe, M.M.

Springfield, Missouri

Marilyn Lowe graduated from Knox College, Phi Beta Kappa, received a MM in Piano With Distinction from Indiana University where she studied with Menahem Pressler, and continued doctoral study in Music Theory at IU under a University Fellowship. Lowe has served as a faculty member of several universities, worked in a variety of capacities in church music, and is presently an independent music teacher. In addition to teaching, Lowe presents internationally about piano pedagogy and is a faculty member of the Gordon Institute of Music Learning. She served as President of the Missouri Music Teachers Association and was awarded Teacher of the Year in Missouri. Significant influences in guiding her career include Nadia Boulanger, Murray Baylor, Francois Poulenc, Benning Dexter, Soulima Stravinsky, Guy Duckworth, Menahem Pressler, Edwin E. Gordon, Dorothy Taubman, Edna Golandsky, and Barbara Lister-Sink.

Since 1992, Lowe has studied Edwin E. Gordon's Music Learning Theory through extensive reading and attending many summer sessions taught by Gordon. She has engaged in practical research over 28 years, applying the development of audiation skill to piano instruction through her 24 book piano method, Music Moves for Piano, created with Gordon's guidance.

Herbert Marshall, Ph.D.

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Herbert Marshall, Ph.D., is a specialist in early childhood and general music teacher education and a member of Kent State University's Music Education faculty--teaching at the Undergraduate, Masters, and Doctoral level. He holds degrees from Michigan State University, Syracuse University, and Temple University, and taught for 11 years in upstate New York. He is certified in Orff Schulwerk and Music Learning Theory--Early Childhood, General Music, and Instrumental Music. He serves on the editorial board of Research and Issues in Music Education, on the Leadership Team of the Alliance for Active Music Making, and on GIML’s Executive Board. He is the author of Strategies for Success in Musical Theatre (Oxford). Other publications include chapters and sections in texts from Oxford, GIA, and Rowman & Littlefield, as well as journal articles. Dr. Marshall is an active clinician, consultant, and conductor, and teaches workshops for the GIML. He has taught music pedagogy workshops throughout the United States as well as in Africa, Asia, and Europe.

Michael E. Martin, M.M.

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Michael E. Martin is one of the original GIML faculty, teaching Instrumental Music, Theory and Applications.  His interest in Music Learning Theory began when he first heard Dr. Gordon speak at a PMEA Conference in the mid-1980’s.  In 1989, after attending a summer Jump Right In workshop with Richard Grunow, Mr. Martin enrolled in graduate studies at Temple University to learn from Dr. Gordon and Dr. Beth Bolton.  He soon began collaborating with Drs. Grunow and Gordon on the first version of Jump Right In-for Strings.

Mr. Martin is author of the Parents’ Guide for Jump Right In: The Instrumental Series, is co-author of Jump Right In: The Instrumental Series-for Strings (Revised Edition), and is a co-author in The Development and Practical Application of Music Learning Theory, all published by GIA.  He served as president of GIML from 2001-2004. 

In addition to his work for GIML, Mr. Martin is currently a private teacher, freelance musician, and Affiliate Artist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where he teaches Instrumental Methods. 

Before retiring, he taught for 40 years in The School District of Haverford Township in suburban Philadelphia.  During his tenure at Haverford, his students performed at Pennsylvania Music Educators Conferences, MENC Eastern Division Conference, and at the National Music Clinic.  Mr. Martin has received the Citation of Excellence from PMEA and the 2013 Outstanding String Teacher Award from the Pennsylvania/Delaware String Teachers Association.

Mr. Martin has been a visiting lecturer in Music Education at Michigan State University, Rowan University, Temple University, The University of Texas at Arlington, Duquesne University, The University of South Carolina, The University at Buffalo, The University of Delaware, Rhode Island College, the Federal Institute of Sao Paolo, Brazil, the Music Academy of St. Cecilia in Lisbon, Portugal, and for the Foundation for Creative Education in Warsaw, Poland.  He has presented clinics and educational sessions at MENC National, MENC Eastern Division, ASTA National, and state MEA Conferences in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, Texas, Ohio, California, and Missouri.  He is a past president of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the National School Orchestra Association and has performed professionally on string bass, bass guitar, tuba, and voice.

Mr. Martin earned a B. S. in music education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a M. M. in music education from West Chester University.  He holds further graduate credits from New England Conservatory, Vander Cook College of Music, Drexel University, and Temple University.

Mr. Martin can be reached at martinme@aol.com or (610) 527-6138.

Jennifer McDonel, Ph.D.

RADFORD UNIVERSITY

Jennifer Sutton McDonel, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Music and Director of Music Education at Radford University. She also is a faculty member/teacher trainer for the Gordon Institute for Music Learning (GIML), teaching Instrumental and Elementary General PDLCs. She holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree, summa cum laude, from The Ohio State University, a Master of Arts in Music Education degree from the Eastman School of Music, and a Ph.D. from the University at Buffalo. Her teaching experience includes early childhood music, elementary general music, 5th – 12th grade instrumental music, and undergraduate and graduate level classes in musicianship, early childhood, elementary general and instrumental music, and foundations of music education. 

Dr. McDonel’s work is published in the GIML Audea, Mass Music News, Perspectives, ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education (CRME) and is a contributing author to TIPS: The Child Voice (2010 revised ed.), Musicianship: Composing in Band and Orchestra (2013), and The Oxford Handbook of Assessment Policy and Practice in Music Education, Vol 1 (2019). She is co-developer of the Harmony & Heart (2021) music and movement program for Primrose Schools, a nationally accredited, early learning and care franchise.

She also is a composer of music for young band and early childhood music classes.  Her works, A Joyful Noise (2004) and Appalachian Whisper (2006) are published in the Boosey & Hawkes Windependence Series. A commissioned work, Nittany Valley Sunrise, was premiered by the combined CCMEA Band and Choir in February 2011. She is a co-composer of Swingin’ from the Start (2012) and Chasin' My Blues Away (2015), a series of pieces written to provide young instrumentalists opportunity to learn swing style jazz interpretation and develop confidence improvising in a concert band setting. These pieces are published by www.PDS4ME.com.

Her compositions “Pounce”, “Macedonia”, and “Stormy Seas” are included in Canti Melodici e Rhythmici Senza Parole (2019), a compilation of songs without words for early childhood. Her compositions “Funny Clown”, “Sneaky Pete”, and “Toddler Talk” and suggested early childhood music activities are included in Music Play II (2020). 

Dr. McDonel’s research interests include measurement of music achievement, achievement and impact of early childhood music learning on children’s overall development, and impact of professional development initiatives on Nepali music teacher’s perceptions of self-efficacy and student learning. Her service is focused on bringing quality music education to all children in Nepal through teacher professional development and advocacy efforts. She may be contacted at jmcdonel2@radford.edu.

Carin McEvoy, M.M.

MSU COMMUNITY MUSIC SCHOOL

Carin McEvoy has been teaching early childhood music for almost 20 years. She earned her  BA and MA in music education from Michigan State University. She currently serves on the finance committee for the Michigan Music Education Association, is a member of the Gordon Institute for Music Learning International Conference planning committee, and is a faculty member of GIML. She currently teaches kindergarten, second, third and fourth grade music for East Lansing Public Schools. She is also an award-winning performer and music director in community theatre musicals throughout the greater Lansing area.

Janna Olson, M.M.

Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

Janna Olson is a sessional instructor at The King’s University in Edmonton, Alberta where she teaches Piano and Piano Pedagogy.  She also maintains a thriving independent piano studio.   Janna is an active clinician, adjudicator, conservatory examiner and collaborative pianist. Her teaching and research interests include music literacy and mentoring. She holds Bachelor degrees in church music and piano performance and a Masters in Applied Music and Piano Pedagogy from the University of Alberta.   She serves as a piano faculty member with the Gordon Institute for Music Learning.

Anna Preston, M.M.

Haddonfield (NJ) Friends School

Anna Preston is the music specialist at Haddonfield Friends School in Haddonfield, NJ, where she teaches general music to children ages 2 through 8th grade. She earned a Bachelor of Music Education degree at the University of Southern Mississippi and a Master of Music in Music Education degree at Temple University. Anna is a member of the teaching faculty for the Gordon Institute for Music Learning. She also served on the faculty of Temple University’s Music Preparatory Division, where she taught Early Childhood Music Foundations for children birth-age 4 and their caregivers.  Anna has presented workshops about early childhood music education in the US and China, and has been published in Audea and Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education.

Jill Reese, Ph.D.

STATE UNIVERSITY OF New York AT FREDONIA

Jill Reese is Associate Professor of Music Education at The State University of New York at Fredonia. She teaches courses including early childhood music pedagogy, elementary and secondary general music methods, and research methods. She presents and publishes research on topics including early childhood music development, ukulele, technology, improvisation, and professional development of preservice and practicing teachers. Her book “Navigating Music Learning Theory: A Guide for General Music Teachers” is available through GIA Publications. She is the founder of Fredonia Ukulele and a YouTube channel that provides play-along videos for ukulele (https://www.youtube.com/user/DrJillReese). She presents various ukulele workshops nationally for teachers, schools, and community groups. She was awarded the Fredonia College Council Award for Community Engagement for facilitating community ukulele and early childhood music experiences through community-university partnerships. She has completed professional development levels in Orff-Schulwerk (Level I) and Music Learning Theory (Level I and II) and is on faculty with the Gordon Institute for Music Learning. She earned degrees in Music Education from Temple University (Ph.D.), University of Michigan (M.M), and Michigan State University (B.M.) and taught vocal/general music in the public schools of Michigan, and early childhood music in Michigan and Pennsylvania.

Alison Reynolds, Ph.D.

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

Dr. Alison Reynolds, Professor of Music Education, the Chair of the Music Education and Therapy Department, and Director of Graduate and Undergraduate Music Education Curriculum. She focuses her research and teaching interests on expressive and creative music development, early childhood and general music teacher preparation, and developing curriculum materials for children 12 years old and younger. Dr. Reynolds has been published in Journal of Research in Music EducationBulletin for the Council of Research in Music EducationArts Education Policy ReviewResearch Studies in Music EducationJournal of Music Teacher EducationJournal of Historical Research in Music EducationPerspectives, and several state music educators' journals. She serves on the editorial review boards for Bulletin of the Council of Research in Music EducationHe Kupu (the word) and International Journal of Music in Early Childhood. Reynolds is co-author of Jump Right In: The Music Curriculum (Revised Edition) and Music Play (1998), which has been translated to the Korean, Lithuanian, and Chinese. She is co-editor and contributing author for Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Elementary General Music. She is lead co-editor and co-author of the recently-published Jump Right In Early Childhood Engagement PlansMusic Play 2, Parts A & B (2020). She is a frequent presenter of research and practice in international, national, regional, state, and local venues.

Dr. Reynolds has guided music education certification students in pre-student teaching coursework for general music methods and music learning and development, and has served as mentor for their independent studies, and Diamond Peer Teacher, Diamond Research Scholar, and Creative Arts and Research and Scholarship awards. At the graduate levels, she has taught Introduction to Research in Music Education, Learning Theory in Music, From Research to Practice in 21st Century Music Education, Seminar, Creative Spaces in Music, and Qualitative Research. She guides graduate students’ extended practice in music settings with persons from birth through 12th grade and higher education, mentoring or collaborating research and practical projects, and offering guidance on independent projects, theses, dissertations, and preparation for music teacher education. In 2017, she received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching from Temple University. From 2012-2018 she served the Early Childhood Music Education Special Research Interest Group as Chair Elect, Chair, and Past Chair within the National Association for Music Education and has served as the Research Chair for Pennsylvania Music Educators Association (PMEA) since 2012.  Since 2011, she has maintained a musicking, collaborative partnership with children and the co-directors (Karen Chayot and Kathy Goldenberg) of Project P.L.A.Y School in Elkins Park. Dr. Reynolds is a member of the Early Childhood and Elementary certification faculty for the Gordon Institute of Music Learning (Theory and Practice), and holds membership in International Society for Music Education, National Association for Music Education, Society for Music Teacher Education, Pennsylvania Music Educators Association, Gordon Institute for Music Learning, American Orff Schulwerk Association, National Association for the Education of Young Children, and Early Childhood Music & Movement Association.

Heather Nelson Shouldice, Ph.D.

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Heather Nelson Shouldice is Associate Professor of Music Education at Eastern Michigan University, where she coordinates the music education program, teaches graduate and undergraduate courses, supervises student teachers, and directs the early childhood music program through EMU’s Community Music Academy. Dr. Shouldice’s research interests include music teacher beliefs and their relationships to teaching practice, music teacher identity development, musical development and musical identity in young children, and issues of gender in music education. Her research has been published numerous journals, including Music Education Research, Research Studies in Music Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, International Journal of Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Journal of Music Teacher Education, and GIML Audea. Prior to entering higher education, Dr. Shouldice taught elementary general music for 10 years in the public schools of Michigan. She is a GIML professional development faculty member in elementary general music and also currently serves as GIML past-president. Dr. Shouldice produces and hosts a podcast about Music Learning Theory called “Everyday Musicality” and publishes a blog called “Research to Real Life,” in which she summarizes published music education research studies and suggests application to teaching practice. Her forthcoming book, Weaving It All Together: A Practical Guide to Applying Gordon’s Music Learning Theory in the Elementary General Music Program, will be available through GIA Publications. Find out more about Dr. Shouldice at her website (www.everydaymusicality.com) or contact her at heathershouldice@gmail.com.

Natasha Sigmund, M.M.

Cinnaminson Township (NJ) Public Schools

Natasha Sigmund devoted the last twenty years to music education, from leading early childhood music classes to working with undergraduate students and music education professionals. Presently she teaches general and vocal music at Cinnaminson Middle School in Cinnaminson, NJ. 

Mrs. Sigmund is a recipient of Presser Foundation award for her work in collecting and adapting authentic Russian music to early childhood and elementary music settings in the United States. Her work with children has been featured on New Jersey Classroom Close-Up television program and One On One with Steve Audubato. Natasha's song collection, "Growing Up With Music", has been implemented by early childhood music professionals in the United States and abroad.

Alden Snell, Ph.D.

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Alden H. Snell, II, is an Associate Professor of Music Teaching and Learning at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate music education courses, supervises student teachers, and advises graduate research.

Dr. Snell earned a Bachelor of Science degree in music education from Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester, NY, where he graduated summa cum laude and was awarded the President’s Award for Outstanding Achievement. He then earned both Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in music education from the Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester. While in residency at Eastman, Dr. Snell was awarded the prestigious Donald J. Shetler Prize, awarded to an outstanding doctoral student in music education.

Prior to his work in higher education, Dr. Snell taught instrumental music to students in all grade levels in the Hilton (NY) and Kendall (NY) Central School Districts, including service as K-12 Director of Music in Kendall. While teaching in public schools, he earned both early childhood and instrumental music certifications from the Gordon Institute for Music Learning (GIML); he joined the GIML faculty in 2015. Between completion of his doctorate and his appointment at Eastman, Dr. Snell was an Assistant Professor of Instrumental Music Education at the University of Delaware.

Dr. Snell’s research interests include teacher musicianship, generative creativity, and music teacher professional development. He is co-editor of Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Instrumental Music, and is co-author of Ready, Set, Improvise! The Nuts and Bolts of Music Improvisation. He is also lead or co-author of research studies published in the Bulletin of the Council of Research in Music Education, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Research Studies in Music Education, and Visions of Research in Music Education. Dr. Snell maintains an active schedule presenting at local, state, national, and international conference venues, including the most recent International Research in Music Education Conference in England, and the 33rd World Conference of the International Society for Music Education in Baku, Azerbaijan.

David Stringham, Ph.D.

JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

David A. Stringham serves as Associate Professor of Music at James Madison University, and was appointed founding director of JMU’s Center for Inclusive Music Engagement in 2018. His teaching and research interests include generative creativity, lifelong music engagement, and music teacher education. Dr. Stringham’s work has been supported by the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the 4-VA Collaborative. He has presented scholarly work in state, national, and international venues, with recent publications in Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Qualitative Research in Music Education, Research Studies in Music Education, Visions of Research in Music Education and as co-editor of Musicianship: Improvising in Band and Orchestra. At JMU, Dr. Stringham mentors undergraduate and graduate researchers, coordinates JMU’s interdisciplinary Music and Human Services minor, and facilitates courses on music technology, musical theatre, and music learning and teaching. He serves as chair of National Association for Music Education’s Creativity Special Research Interest Group, an editorial board member for College Music Society’s Emerging Fields in Music series, and as editor of the peer-reviewed, open-access journal Research and Issues in Music Education. Prior to joining JMU in 2010, Dr. Stringham taught middle school and high school instrumental music in Williamsville and Greece (New York) public schools and earned degrees (BM with highest distinction, MM, Ph.D.) from University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music.

Cynthia Taggart, Ph.D.

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Cynthia Crump Taggart is Professor of Music Education Emeritus at Michigan State University, where she directed and taught in the Early Childhood Music Program of the Community Music School of Michigan State University's College of Music, served as Chair of Music Education, served as Associate Director for Graduate Studies, and taught university courses focusing on music in early childhood, elementary general music, measurement, research, and the psychology of music. During her 26 years MSU, she directed 33 masters theses and 26 dissertations. She received her B.M. and M.M. from the University of Michigan and PhD from Temple University, where she studied with Edwin E. Gordon. As an MSU faculty member, she received the Beal Outstanding Faculty Award, the Withrow Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Curricular Service Learning and Civic Engagement Award, and the Teacher-Scholar Award. Prior to teaching at MSU, she taught at Case Western Reserve University, where she won the Undergraduate Teaching Excellence Award for the Humanities and Social Sciences. She has extensive elementary and early childhood teaching experience in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania. In 2015, she was named the Outstanding Music Educator of the Year by the Michigan Music Education Association. In 2020, she was inducted into the Hall of Honor by the Early Childhood Music and Movement Association.

Dr. Taggart's publications include co-authorship of Music Play (with Valerio, Reynolds, Bolton, and Gordon), Music Play 2 (with Reynolds and Valerio), Jump Right In: The Music Curriculum (with Bolton, Reynolds, Valerio, Gordon, Lange, and Bailey), and Best Music for Young Band (with Dvorak), as well as co-editorship of Learning from Young Children (with Burton), The Development and Practical Applications of Music Learning Theory (with Runfola), and Readings in Music Learning Theory (with Walters). She also has been published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Update, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Perspectives: The Official Journal of the Early Childhood Music and Movement Association, and several state music education journals. In addition, she has contributed chapters to many scholarly music education books. 

Cynthia currently serves as the President of the Gordon Institute for Music Learning (GIML) and served as the President of the College Music Society. She is Past Chair of the Early Childhood Music Special Research Interest Group (NAfME) and was a member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Educational Board. Dr. Taggart is a member of the GIML Early Childhood (Practice and Theory) and Elementary General Music (Practice and Theory) faculties, teaching professional development levels courses in Music Learning Theory. She continues to be a frequent presenter at national and international (Portugal, Australia, Taiwan, China, and Brazil) research and practitioner conferences.

Wendy Valerio, Ph.D.

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Wendy Valerio, Ph.D. is Professor of Music Education, Director of Student Teaching, and Director of the Children's Music Development Center (CMDC) at the University of South Carolina (UofSC) School of Music in Columbia, SC where she teaches graduate and undergraduate music methods courses, directs master’s theses and doctoral dissertations, and conducts early childhood music development research. Wendy and her graduate students provide weekly Music Play classes at UofSC School of Music, Bright Horizons at UofSC, and St. Peter’s Catholic Elementary School in Columbia. In 2020, Dr. Valerio received the UofSC Mungo Undergraduate Teaching Award and in 2018 she received the South Carolina Music Educators Association Outstanding Mentor Teacher Award.

Dr. Valerio received her B.M.E from Baker University, Baldwin City, KS and her M.M.E and Ph.D degrees from Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. She is a member of the GIML Professional Development Learning Courses faculty (Early Childhood and Elementary General), and she frequently presents professional development seminars in the US and Europe.

Dr. Valerio’s scholarly work is featured in Journal for Research in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Perspectives: A Publication of the Early Childhood Music and Movement Association, Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Elementary General Music (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019), Musicianship-focused Curriculum and Assessment (GIA, 2015), Learning from Young Children: Research in Early Childhood Music (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011), Music Experience in Our Lives: Expanding the Boundaries of Music Education (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009), Listen to Their Voices, Research to Practice: A Biennial Series, Volume 3 (Canadian Music Educators Association, 2007), and The Development and Practical Application of Music Learning Theory (GIA, 2005). She is co-author of Music Play 2 (GIA, 2020), Music Play (GIA, 1998) and Jump Right In! The Music Curriculum, K-4 (GIA, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2010). She was also co-editor of Early Childhood Arts Education in the United States: A Special Issue of Arts Education Policy Review (2017).
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